Stage 19

Garmin Sharp used some tactical savvy to make the most of the course and conditions by first placing a man in the break (who jumped clear as they were being reeled in) and bridging a strong man (Navardauskas) across with about 30km to go. Six Garmin riders then rode at the front to disrupt the chase and this combined with the wet weather, crash and windy/lumpy course, made for success.

Stage 20 ITT

Fairly predictable here (nice work Tony), so I thought I would go through some guidelines on effective pacing in a TT.

Some tips for the TT using HR as a guide:

  1. Make sure you have a good warm up (future post to come on warm up strategies) and aim to finish (or keep moving at L1-2) as close as practical to the start eg 5mins. Keep legs ticking over at the start if you can too.
  2. get up to speed quickly eg.80% sprint to 40-45km/h (same at the half way turn),
  3. it will take a minute or two for HR to catch up (quicker if you finish your warm up close to the start), so be conservative at the start (maybe sit on your goal average TT pace (wind dependent) till HR is 5-10bpm above OBLA (this will vary between race lengths and individuals and will need to be established in training).
  4. Target HR will probably be around OBLA +10bpm (lower to start with and higher in the second half).
  5. You can go a little harder into the wind or uphill too (e.g. 5bpm) and a little easier with the wind and downhill.

Often if you break up the TT into quarters, it helps you have a goal for each bit (write it on masking tape and put it on your handle bars) e.g.:

  1. up to speed and HR OBLA +5bpm
  2. push to OBLA +7bpm
  3. up to speed after turn and OBLA +10bpm
  4. use up the last of your reserves to be done on the line eg OBLA +12bpm or more (be even though – you don’t want to blow up!)
  5. for any segment up the HR by say 3-5bpm uphill or into the wind and down 3-5bpm for the opposite.

Some tips for the TT using power as a guide:

  1. get up to speed quickly eg. wind up at about 60% of your sprint power (5-700w) for 10-15s to get you up to your goal average speed (repeat this at the turn),
  2. once up to speed, settle into target wattage for the first quarter (a little below target wattage for the whole TT e.g. 10w or so)
  3. You can go a little harder into the wind or uphill too (e.g. 5%) and a little easier with the wind and downhill.

It is good to break up the TT into quarters as it helps you have a goal for each segment (write it on masking tape and put it on your handle bars).

The below example is for a rider who can average about 355-360w for the amount of time it will take to do the TT e.g.:

  1. up to speed and 350w
  2. push to 355w
  3. up to speed after turn and 360w
  4. use up the last of your reserves to be done on the line eg say 370w (be even though – you don’t want to blow up!)
  5. for any segment up the watts by 15-20w uphill or into the wind and down 15-20w for the opposite.

Compare HR and power once you download the TT file. You may find those wattages too hard or too easy as a lot of things can vary when you get into the TT position. You want to find the maximum wattage you can do for a TT with the above type of plan. In training you could try a 20min max effort to gauge your 20min power in TT position and use this to guide you further.

Some handy links on TT pacing:

Subscribe To The Fitlab Newsletter

For the latest offers, pro training tips, sport science and aero advice...

You have Successfully Subscribed!

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This

Share This

Share this post with your friends!